ClojureScript vs clojure.core.async

I’m going to make a somewhat bold statement: core.async does not work with ClojureScript. And, in this post, I’m going to show some examples why this is true, at least for the current versions of core.async.

So let’s start by understanding a little bit about the runtime: Javascript is a single-threaded runtime that implicitly runs an event-loop. So, for example, when you ask to read a file, you can do it synchronously or asynchronously. If you decide to run in that asynchronously, it means that as soon as you issue the fs.readFile command, you need to register a callback and the control is returned to the “main thread”. It’ll keep running until it runs out of commands to execute, then the runtime will wait the result from the callback; when it returns, the function that you registered will be called with the file contents. When the function ends, the JS runtime will await to see if there’s any other pending call, and it’ll exit if there’s nothing else to do.

The same thing happens in browser environment, but in this case the callbacks are events from the DOM: like clicking on buttons or listening for changes in some elements. The same rules apply here: the runtime is single threaded and when something happens it will first execute everything that needs to be executed, then it will be called back with the event that happened.

So maybe we can change these callbacks with core.async channels right? But the answer is no, because core.asyncs go blocks will not run in different threads (because, again, the runtime is single-threaded). Instead, it creates a state machine and it’ll control of when each of these go blocks will be called, at what time, eventually replacing the event-loop that Javascript environment already have.
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(check (my-code) => (needs :tests))

So, yesterday I made a talk (in Portuguese only, unfortunately) about the difficulties of testing Clojure and ClojureScript code. Specifically, I think the most problematic issue is the lack of “custom matcher libraries”, and how the default error messages are kinda bad and don’t help you identify the problems.

Then, on Clojurians’ #announcements Slack channel, I found that clojure.test Expectations library have a new version. So, why not integrate it on my Check library, and maybe continue developing it?

What is check?

Midje is too magic. Clojure.test is too little. Thinking about findind a “middle ground” I’ve started the “check” project, and I’m using it to test my personal projects like Chlorine, Clover, REPL-Tooling and Paprika. The problem is that, while the API is stable, but it still doesn’t do all the things I want.
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There’s a little Haskell in your Javascript

This may seem a little strange, but althrough Javascript is a dynamic language, with very loose typing (automatic convertions, equals signs that only works on arrays/numbers/undefined/nil), lots of things that are “falsy” by default, with the new promise-based approach of Javascript, the language is borrowing some very interesting concepts from Haskell.

And yes, this is a great thing. And yes, this will probably change the way we program.

Let’s begin by talking about Javascript, and its new features. Old async-javascript code was probably like this:

some_io_function(function(result) {
  find_name_in_db(result.person_id, function(name) {
    console.log(name);
  })
});

Now, it’s like this:

some_io_function()
  .then((result) => find_name_in_db(result.person_id))
  .then(console.log)

And, with new ES6 features:

async () => {
  var result = await some_io_function();
  var name = await find_name_in_db(result.person_id);
  console.log(name)
}

Now, what does this have to do with Haskell? Multiple things, but the most important: Functors!
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