Killing Atom

So, Microsoft blogger decided to post about “sunsetting Atom”.

Honestly it’s an amazing euphemism for “for killing Atom” so I’m not going to bother to sweet-coat anything: in fact this post will probably have some harsh words, so if you like Microsoft (for some reason) I advise you to stop reading…

Anyway: Microsoft is a shitty piece of crap company. They committed so many crimes and the reason why they didn’t answer for most of these is because they bought the lawyers that were accusing them. When they they posted that they are going to Sunset Atom, it sounded like an inevitable thing – Atom was stalled, so they’re going to archive the repositories and if someone wants to keep using this just fork it and keep developing the editor.

But the truth is – not even this is possible. And we’re going to find out why in a moment, but first a little bit of story:

Even though Microsoft told everybody that they were going to keep developing the editor, it is strange that years later they decided to just give up on the idea. But this decision was not rushed in any way – they were planning to do that for a long time!
(more…)

The end of an era: goodbye, GitHub

We all knew that Microsoft would destroy GitHub. Well, I hope we all knew. I knew it too, but somehow, I thought: it doesn’t matter. Maybe they’ll add some commercial features, maybe they’ll force some integration over VSCode or Visual Studio, but anyway, I didn’t think, at the time, that they’ll be able to make something really bad about it.

This ends now.

Microsoft (I’ll not use GitHub anymore here. I’ll keep GitHub for Atom, probably, but that’s how far I’m willing to go) decided that “public repos are reusable pieces of software” regardless of license, with their “Copilot” product. Yes, people are saying that’s legal, fair trade, blah blah blah. I don’t buy it, and I believe it’s only because it’s Microsoft that they are speaking like this. Every other system that inputs <copyrighted-content> and outputs <content>, when the input and output are the same “kind” (music, painting, code, poetry) needs to be aware of the original license, and that’s final. In fact, every tool that tried to do this in the past WAS victim of copyright strikes – so why Microsoft is not? In fact, there’s public code that’s not open source on Microsoft’s servers. If they are so sure that it’s not a “derivative work”, why didn’t they train their ML with private repositories? With Microsoft’s own private code? The answer is obvious – only the fool don’t want to see.

Anyway, I’ll be removing all code from Microsoft starting now. Unfortunately, there are issues to code cooperation and other things if I decide to self-host a solution, so until Gitea allows for federated content, I’ll got with Gitlab. I’ll start with Chlorine, Clover, and similar projects like REPL-Tooling, Duck-REPLed and Vision. Then, maybe I’ll start moving things on demand (after all, all code that EXIST today was slurped by Microsoft already, so why should I bother removing the damage that already was done). So, here I’ll try to document my process:
(more…)