Putting REPL-Tooling to test – VSCode!

Sometimes you make some tooling because you want to use it; sometimes, to experiment; and sometimes to test the waters.

The last tooling in that I did was one of these cases – now there’s a port of Chlorine to Visual Studio Code called Clover!

Now, when I started the project I imagined that VSCode would not have all the features that I have in Atom, nor all the APIs that I want to use – for example I didn’t have any hope of having the inline results in this version.

The thing is, I wasn’t expecting it to be so bad! To begin with, the API: is not really that bad documented, but compared to the Atom, it is incredibly weak. The first thing is that they expect you to use TypeScript so there’s little to no documentation on how to represent objects in pure JavaScript; for example in some cases you can use pure objects, on others you have to instantiate a TypeScript class in the JavaScript code. Also, there are multiple parts of the documentation when they just give you the type signatures and little (or even no) explanation (and let’s make a little detour here: what’s the deal with some people that use static types, that they expect you to understand how any API work just by showing the types of the functions?).

The second part is that VSCode expects you to fit your plug-in infrastructure on what they offer – so, some functionalities will land on the “peek definition” API, others on “Code Lens” and so on. The problem is that they don’t explain what’s a “code lens” for example nor give you any screenshots of the functionality in action – mostly the documentation is some code examples in GitHub repositories so you have to download, install the example extension on your machine and then run it to simply understand how something works.

The second hard part is that you can’t test the API in the devtools – in fact the devtools is almost useless because when you have an error, the stacktrace will point you to a minified JS code in the VSCode internal API. Also, some exception messages are completely obscure and some log errors on the devtools but things work fine on the editor. Well, to summarize: it’s completely useless to depend on the errors.

But the worst part, at least for REPL-Tooling, is that you can’t change the UI of VSCode in any way – and this means no pop-ups, no new elements, no console in the editor, nothing – the only way you have that you can extend the visual components is by implementing a webview – and by webview I am not saying an “electrom webview” when you can access all the Node.JS APIs – I am saying a simple web page when you have to pass your data to and from the editor using JSON. And and that’s all there is – no Date, no JavaScript classes and, of course no Clojure objects.
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Complex testing – the saga

While I’m developing Chlorine, sometimes I need to test multiple specific implementations of lots of really complicated stuff like REPL state, connection, async stuff (as the project is ClojureScript on Node.JS, all I/O treatment is via callbacks) and the complicated nature of rendering multiple different object types on Atom editor. I had multiple regression errors, then I’ve created some “acceptance” tests (these open up a real Atom editor and evaluate commands on it). The problem with these tests should be obvious: they are slow, and I mean REALLY SLOW, and they need a real Atom editor, lots of setups, and because Atom is not really predictable on its actions (sometimes you connect REPL and it changes the focus on the editor) there are lots of unnecessary interactions on the editor just to have less false-negatives.

Now, as I told before, I’m developing Chlorine together with REPL-Tooling, a library that should contain all tooling for any editor capable of running Javascript to run a port or Chlorine. There’s still too much on Chlorine that relies on internal Atom APIs (for example, detection of the beginning and end of forms is one, detection of namespace’s forms is other) but time is passing and more and more is being moved to REPL-Tooling, and as soon as the detection of forms is on REPL-Tooling (and is stable) there should be possible to port most Clojure parts to REPL-Tooling, and then I can think on how to refactor the ClojureScript part, test it, and then Chlorine will be a very easy project to port. Also, as a proof-of-concept there’s Clematis for NeoVIM (it’s still on the very beginning and nothing much happened after I wrote about it here), and also an “electron fake editor” that I’m using as test.

Wait, What?
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Chlorine is thriving!

When I started this project, I was experimenting with shadow-cljs to see if I would be able to make an Atom package that would auto reload, run tests on ClojureScript, and se how far could I push ClojureScript in an Atom package.

Now, some months later, I’m seeing the package being used by a bunch of people, and I even discovered some bugs in UNREPL! Now, on this post, I’ll discuss a little bit more in detail the design decisions and my vision on the future of the project.

Chlorine is a clojure and ClojureScript atom package. It connects to a socket repl (opened via lein, boot, clj, shadow-cljs, lumo, or even REBL) and then upgrades the repl to be programmatically oriented with unrepl. Unrepl only works on Clojure, so for ClojureScript we use other techniques. Also, socket repl is a stream protocol, so to emulate a “request-response”, we need to coordinate things so Atom (and other editors) can react to commands and know exactly what’s the correct response for each command sent.

Design decisions

The choice for UNREPL was mostly because there is almost no documentation about prepl so far. Also, Socket REPL is literally everywhere: on Clojure , on ClojureCLR, on Lumo and Plank. Also, I wanted a better way to use ClojureScript, and I still have nightmares trying to use it over nREPL… and with Socket REPL things work fine.

Also, when I started the project Clojure 1.10 was just alpha software, and UNREPL offers us insanely good support for lazy lists, big strings, and other things that I wanted to use out of the box. One of the problems I’m still facing is coordination of evaluate/response, but this will probably be solved after a bunch of other fixes I’ll try.
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My fading frustration with ClojureScript

I’ve talked about at another post on how ClojureScript frustrates me, mostly because I was doing some Node.JS work and Figwheel simply wasn’t working correctly. Now, it’s time to revisit these points:

A little update: I talked a little with Thomas Heller, Shadow-CLJS creator, and he pointed me some issues with this article, so I’ll update it acordingly

Tooling

Figwheel and Lein are not the best tools to work with ClojureScript. Since I discovered shadow-cljs, things are working way better than before: I can reload ClojureScript code from any target, and I’m even experimenting with Hubot (and it works really fine too). The only thing I’m missing is my profiles.clj file, but I can live with that (and I can always use Shadow with Lein if I need profiles.clj).

Also, I’m working on a new package for Atom (and in the future, for another editors too) called Chlorine. One of the ideas is to offer better ClojureScript support (we have Autocomplete now!), using Socket REPL for solutions (even self-hosted REPLs like Lumo and Plank) and even wrap UNREPL protocol in Clojure. So far, is still in the very beginning but things are looking promising!

The stack

Forget Figwheel at all: Shadow-CLJS is probably the best tooling for ClojureScript ever. It auto-reloads ClojureScript code for the browser, for node.js, for node modules, and it integrates with almost everything that you want. It controls release optimizations, have sensible defaults, and even have post-compile hooks (so you can hook Clojure code to do something after some compilation phases). Also, it integrates with node-modules (no more maven-wrappers for JS libraries!) and have some warnings when you use some kind of ClojureScript code that would break :advanced compilation. And, let’s not forget that you can control the refresh reload phase, it adds a userful :include-macros in ns form (that will include all macros from the namespace being required), and controls exports in a sane manner. But first let’s begin with the feature that I found most useful: :before-load-async.
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